Puck the Fairy

Wouldst know what tricks, by the pale moonlight,
Are played by me, the merry little Sprite,
Who wing thro’ air from the camp to the court,
From king to clown, and of all make sport;
Singing, I am the Sprite
Of the merry midnight,
Who laugh at weak mortals and love the moonlight.

To a miser’s bed, where he snoring slept
And dreamt of his cash, I slyly crept;
Chink, chink o’er his pillow like money I rang,
And he waked to catch—but away I sprang,
Singing, I am the Sprite
Of the merry midnight,
Who laugh at weak mortals and love the moonlight.

I saw thro’ the leaves, in a damsel’s bower,
She was waiting her love at that starlight hour:
“Hist—hist!” quoth I, with an amorous sigh,
And she flew to the door, but away flew I,
Singing, I am the Sprite
Of the merry midnight,
Who laugh at weak mortals and love the moonlight.

While a bard sat inditing an ode to his love,
Like a pair of blue meteors I stared from above,
And he swooned—for he thought ’twas the ghost, poor man!
Of his lady’s eyes, while away I ran,
Singing, I am the Sprite
Of the merry midnight,
Who laugh at weak mortals and love the moonlight.

Ω

Sir Thomas Moore was an Irish poet, singer, songwriter, and entertainer, now best remembered for the lyrics of The Minstrel Boy and the The Last Rose of Summer.