Starry Night

Starry Night depicts the view outside his sanitarium room window at night, although it was painted from memory during the day. Widely hailed as his magnum opus, the painting has been reproduced many times and is one of his most renowned paintings.

The center part shows the village of Saint-Rémy under a swirling sky, in a view from the asylum towards north. The Alpilles far to the right fit to this view, but there is little rapport of the actual scene with the intermediary hills which seem to be derived from a different part of the surroundings, south of the asylum. The cypress tree to the left was added into the composition.

In a letter to his brother Theo, Vincent says,

“Where these lines are close and deliberate it begins to be a picture, even if it is exaggerated. That is a little what Bernard and Gauguin feel, they do not ask the correct shape of a tree at all, but they insist absolutely that one can say if the shape is round or square—and my word, they are right, exasperated as they are by certain people’s photographic and empty perfection. Certainly they will not ask the correct tone of the mountains, but they will say: In the Name of God, the mountains were blue, were they? Then chuck on some blue and don’t go telling me that it was a blue rather like this or that, it was blue, wasn’t it? Good—make them blue and it’s enough! Gauguin is sometimes like a genius when he explains this, but as for the genius Gauguin has, he is very timid about showing it, and it is touching the way he likes to say something really useful to the young. How strange he is all the same.”

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Vincent van Gogh did not embark upon a career as an artist until the age of 27, and then only painted for a brief 10 years before his suicide in 1890. He incorporated Impressionism’s and Neo-Impressionism’s brighter colors and style of painting into a uniquely recognizable style.